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Help Save the Bees - Plant Flowers

Winter Seeds Now Available

Plant flowers that help save the bees and other pollinators. Choose from Wild Bergamot and Echinacea.

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Availability: In stock

Product Name Price Qty
Good Bug Blooms Seed Pack
$3.95
Pollinator Petal Patch Seed Pack
$3.95

Out of stock

Echinacea Seed Pack
$3.95
Wild Bergamot Seed Pack
$3.95

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Wild Bergamot

This native wildflower graces the landscape with its light lavender blossoms, offering nectar to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. To humans, Wild Bergamot provides food and medicine. Its leaves and flowers are highly aromatic and spicy, like Greek Oregano, and are used similarly. Sip teas made from the leaves and flowers or add them to sauces, soups, and salads. Make tinctures to support the upper respiratory system. Or, most simply, toss the lovely tubular flowers onto any dish.

GROWING INSTRUCTIONS: Broadcast Wild Bergamot outside about 8 weeks before the first fall frost, or surface sow indoors 4-6 weeks before last frost and gently press the seeds into the soil, then transplant seedlings outside in spring or summer, 6-8 weeks later. Plants usually do not produce flowers until their second year. Leaves and foliage are edible, and make a delicious tea.

Organic Echinacea

Sometimes Latin can be misleading. Echinos, the greek word from which Echinacea is derived, means hedgehog or sea urchin. While this descriptor helps paint a picture of the bristly head of this coneflower, it does little to place the plant in space and time. This variety is native to eastern America, noticeably devoid of the aforementioned exotic fauna. The medicinal properties of this perennial native have been know and used for centuries. Although its popularity as a medicinal herb has gone in and out of fashion over the last 10 years, it continues to be widely used as a well researched all purpose immune booster. Echinacea's distinct purple hue and drooping petals have made it a well loved ornamental with the bonus of attracting and feeding important native pollinators. Regardless of the mildly misguided latin allusions, this plant will be at home in your garden for years to come.

GROWING INSTRUCTIONS: Perennial. Start very early in a protected spot that experiences some cold. Or, winter sow the seeds in December and then thin to 24" spacing in the spring when the seedlings are 3" high. Plants reach 3-4' high at maturity. Tolerates drought conditions. Grow in full sun or partial shade. Can be propagated by root cuttings and shared with neighbors.