Our studio is currently open and fulfilling orders, however due to issues related to Covid-19 we are only shipping on Monday and Friday. Please keep this in mind when placing orders with us. Stay safe and healthy,The Bee Raw Team.
FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $85
Our studio is currently open and fulfilling orders, however due to issues related to Covid-19 we are only shipping on Monday and Friday. Please keep this in mind when placing orders with us.
Stay safe and healthy, The Bee Raw Team.
FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $85
 
My Cart ( 0 )
Close

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Settings

Skip to Main Content »

You're currently on:

Help Save the Bees - Plant Flowers

SPRING SEEDS NOW AVAILABLE

Plant flowers that help save the bees and other pollinators. Choose from Good Bug Blooms and Pollinator Petal Patch.

Learn More >>

Availability: In stock

Product Name Price Qty
Pollinator Petal Patch Seed Pack
$3.95

Out of stock

Echinacea Seed Pack
$3.95

Out of stock

Wild Bergamot Seed Pack
$3.95

Out of stock

Good Bug Blooms Seed Pack
$3.95

Why Bee Raw?

Real. Raw. Sustainable.
1% of profits go to Save the Bees

Sending a gift?

Include a personal
message at checkout

Shipping

Free Home Delivery
on Orders over $85

We’re here to help

Contact Us and we’ll promptly
respond 9a-5p Eastern M-F

Pair this item with

More About This Product

Details

Good Bug Blooms

Sow this beneficial mix of annuals in the spring. There's always more to do in the garden than we can do alone, so why not invite some little friends to help out? The green lacewing on this pack will love these flowers and reward your generosity by laying eggs in your garden. The eggs will hatch into "aphid lions," their larval stage, which will voraciously devour insect pests. Get to know and love the good bugs in your garden by providing nectar and habitat for them to thrive.

GROWING INSTRUCTIONS: All annual flowers. Broadcast and rake in lightly in spring after last frost, then keep watered until germination. Thin to about a 12" spacing–wider for bushier plants, tighter for a dense mix of blooms.

Pollinator Petal Patch

Why do flowers come in so many colors? One theory is that the colors attract pollinators. But insects, including solitary bees, honey bees, butterflies, wasps, and flies, don’t see color the same way we do. Their compound eyes can detect most of the colors we can—but they also see UV light, invisible to humans. To their eyes, every beautiful bloom is a veritable bullseye, a combination of visible and UV light patterns that guide them toward sustaining nectar, thus continuing the cycle of life.

GROWING INSTRUCTIONS: For the best mix, direct sow in fall. Can also be direct sown in early spring around last frost date. Broadcast evenly into a well-prepared, weed-free bed. Packet covers an area of approximately 30' square in size. Rake in lightly, and keep watered until germination. When seedlings set true leaves, thin to about 12-18" apart. This mix contains a combination of perennials and self-sowing annuals. Some varieties will bloom now; the full mix will appear in the second year.

Wild Bergamot

This native wildflower graces the landscape with its light lavender blossoms, offering nectar to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. To humans, Wild Bergamot provides food and medicine. Its leaves and flowers are highly aromatic and spicy, like Greek Oregano, and are used similarly. Sip teas made from the leaves and flowers or add them to sauces, soups, and salads. Make tinctures to support the upper respiratory system. Or, most simply, toss the lovely tubular flowers onto any dish.

GROWING INSTRUCTIONS: Broadcast Wild Bergamot outside about 8 weeks before the first fall frost, or surface sow indoors 4-6 weeks before last frost and gently press the seeds into the soil, then transplant seedlings outside in spring or summer, 6-8 weeks later. Plants usually do not produce flowers until their second year. Leaves and foliage are edible, and make a delicious tea.

Organic Echinacea

Sometimes Latin can be misleading. Echinos, the greek word from which Echinacea is derived, means hedgehog or sea urchin. While this descriptor helps paint a picture of the bristly head of this coneflower, it does little to place the plant in space and time. This variety is native to eastern America, noticeably devoid of the aforementioned exotic fauna. The medicinal properties of this perennial native have been know and used for centuries. Although its popularity as a medicinal herb has gone in and out of fashion over the last 10 years, it continues to be widely used as a well researched all purpose immune booster. Echinacea's distinct purple hue and drooping petals have made it a well loved ornamental with the bonus of attracting and feeding important native pollinators. Regardless of the mildly misguided latin allusions, this plant will be at home in your garden for years to come.

GROWING INSTRUCTIONS: Perennial. Start very early in a protected spot that experiences some cold. Or, winter sow the seeds in December and then thin to 24" spacing in the spring when the seedlings are 3" high. Plants reach 3-4' high at maturity. Tolerates drought conditions. Grow in full sun or partial shade. Can be propagated by root cuttings and shared with neighbors.